The sun is the most important thing in our solar system. Without it, we would not exist. How large is it in comparison to other stars? The circumference of the sun is approximately 2.74 million miles (4.36 million kilometers). It may be the biggest thing in this neighborhood but the sun is just average when you compare it to other stars. Betelgeuse for example a red giant and has a circumference of 700 times that of the sun and is 14000 times brighter than its counterpart.

How many percent of the stars are greater than the Sun?


We don’t know for sure, but many scientists estimate that around 20% of stars are bigger than the sun. Some astronomers think that only about 0.000001% of stars have a mass greater than four suns. The gravity on these super-massive stars is so intense that they burn their nuclear fuel much faster and die early in life before humans even evolve!

What is the biggest thing in the universe?


Astronomers are still arguing about that. But the sun is pretty big—about 100 times wider than Earth, and if you tried to line up nine of them across our planet’s equator, they would reach all the way from pole-to-pole! The sun also spins very fast. It takes just 25 days for a point on its surface (called the solar equator) to go all the way around once.

Well, it may be bigger than anything else in this neighborhood by several light-years but compared with other stars it’s rather punning… Betelgeuse for example which is only 640 million km away – so close as stars go – is 700 times larger than our sun and 14 000 times brighter! And there are stars billions of times bigger than Betelgeuse.

What about the sun compared to other solar-type stars?


The sun is classified as a G V star – in order (from hottest) O, B, A, F, G, K, and M with 0 being the hottest. Our sun falls between type G and K which means it’s not quite hot enough or bright enough to be considered one of the “regular” stars like our Sun but you can see that there are many types beyond what we would normally consider normal! To give you an idea of just how small our sun is on this range astronomers have worked out that if a red giant were placed at 100 AU from us then its surface area would extend up to Earth’s orbit.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here